ON AIR

imageedit_27_5803667992.png

RADIO IS A FOREIGN COUNTRY is a not-for-profit radio platform and mixtape series featuring cut-ups of international radio broadcasts (AM, FM & shortwave), sound travelogues, and obscure regional folk and pop music from the global hinterlands. Our mission is to explore forgotten and new ways of making radio, and to facilitate greater access and exposure to sounds and music not sufficiently documented by industrial music curation.

info@radioisaforeigncountry.org

  • SoundCloud
  • YouTube
  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • 7qk2u1qolb5gehic1l5se7d3s4-ecbcd722b301d68df34599ff1149f8b0

RECEPTION REPORTS

TSHIRT ORDER TRANSPARENT HQ.png

Please consider supporting RADIO IS A FOREIGN COUNTRY. Your support will help cover operating costs, purchase rare & obscure music to share with you here, pay modest commissions to our guest contributors, and launch new projects. Just click on the PayPal link below. Listeners who make a donation of $50 or more will get a t-shirt, a physical "QSL" card, and 3 RIAFC digital mixtapes.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS
SOUTHEAST ASIA @ 78RPM: A SELECTION OF VIETNAMESE & CAMBODIAN SHELLAC (RIAFC068)

A selection of Vietnamese & Cambodian shellac, curated by Sam Touch/Khmer Records Archives. The 78s featured in this mix range from the early teens to the late 1950s, and are just a small selection of what was available during that time period. You' ll hear traditional songs, as well as some obscure titles and performances. The styles include Cải lương from vietnam, a sort of traditional opera and pleng ka from Cambodia, traditional wedding music, Lakon Basak, a type of theater similar to Chinese opera; Reung Ayai, a type of male and female vocal duet that is used to tell stories and entertain – The Khmer Record Archives

TRACKLIST
0:00-3:12 Bài Kỳ Huế Và Nam Ai
3:12-6:06 Phùng Kiev lý Đang
6:06-8:54 Ah Dy Kom brung
8:54-12:04 Lakon Basak
12:04-15:06 Soda Yong Plaing
15:06-21:08 Sầu Vương Đầy Mồ
21:08-27:24 Pleng Oun Meta Sday
27:24-33:45 Reung Kun Chang Kun Pain
33:45-40:38 Reung Neang Bada Cha
40:38-46:21 Reung Tep Sangva
46:21-52:02 Chan Ta Lom
52:02-57:29 Reung Do Dav

AFGHAN RECORDS - NAUJAWANAN BAIDAR

A beautiful selection of 60’s & 70’s Afghan records selected by Naujawanan Baidar (N.R. Safi), the artist behind the phenomenal label Radio Khiyaban, which features 1970s Afghan cassette culture filtered through a labyrinth of buzzing drones, tape manipulation, and fuzz-drenched percussion. In this mix, Naujawanan Baidar presents a treasure trove of Afghan records influential to his own music.

Check out Radio Khiyaban's bandcamp page here: radiokhiyaban.bandcamp.com

LAOTIAN FOLK MUSIC ON VCD – LAURENT JEANNEAU (KINK GONG)

Laurent Jeanneau (aka Kink Gong) has spent years recording rare and obscure ethnic music from all over southeast Asia. He also collects video compact discs (VCDs), the most widely available format in Asia for everything from kung fu movies to pop music videos. Laurent recently dug into his VCD collection, most found in the markets of small, rural towns throughout the region, and selected some great Khmu and Lao folk music from Laos for your listening pleasure. All of the songs selected for this mix feature the 16-tube bamboo reed or mouth organ (khene). Listen closely and you’ll hear different singing styles and patterns typical of the country’s two major ethnic groups and geographic zones, the Khmu in the north and the Lao in the south. All of the tracks are raw and intimate, recorded on location, and feature the occasional chorus of crickets and other ambient sounds and noises typical of rural Laos. Tracks 1, 3, 5, 7, etc are Khmu, and tracks 2, 4, 6, 8 etc are Lao.

 

Check out Kink Gong's bandcamp page here: https://kinkgong.bandcamp.com/ 

WISISI (WEST PAPUA)

A selection of wisisi music from West Papua. Wisisi or “sapusa” is a dance and genre of music among indigenous peoples in the mountains of West Papua. According to some, it was originally a dance performed during mourning rituals among the Dani people. It was then introduced to neighboring tribes in the late 1990s and, since then, has exploded in popularity. This is especially the case among indigenous youth, who have created a more modern sound using keyboards, audio processors, and drum machines. Wisisi symbolizes cohesiveness and enthusiasm and is often performed to stir up passions in various contexts and situations, including political demonstrations. It appears that wisisi has circulated almost exclusively in the form of Youtube videos.

 

Many thanks to Kasimyn (Gabber Modus Operandi) for first introducing me to this beautiful music.

PHOTO CREDIT: ALIM BOEANA